HIV and AIDS Statistics - Worldwide

Updated December 2015

At the beginning of 2015, there were 36.9 million [34.3 million – 41.4 million] people living with HIV. This reflects the continued large number of new HIV infections and a significant expansion of access to antiretroviral (anti-HIV) therapy, which has helped reduce AIDS-related deaths, especially in more recent years. Currently, 15.8 million people access antiretroviral therapy.

Worldwide, 2 million [1.9 million – 2.2 million] people became newly infected with HIV in 2014, down from estimates from previous years. 25 countries have seen a 50% or greater drop in new HIV infections since 2001. In 2011, new infections in children were 43% lower than in 2003, and 24% lower than 2009.

AIDS-related deaths are decreasing: In 2012, 1.6 million [1.4 million – 1.9 million] people died from AIDS-related illnesses, down from 1.7 million [1.5 million–1.9 million] in 2011 —24% fewer deaths than in 2005. AIDS-related deaths have fallen by 42% since the peak in 2004.

An aging epidemic: An increasingly significant trend in the global HIV epidemic is the growing number of people aged 50 years and older, who are living with HIV. Worldwide, an estimated 3.6 [3.2–3.9] million people aged 50 years and older are living with HIV. This “aging” of the HIV epidemic is mainly due to three factors: the success of antiretroviral therapy in prolonging the lives of people living with HIV; decreasing HIV incidence among younger adults shifting the disease burden to older ages; and the often-unmeasured, and thus often overlooked, fact that people aged 50 years and older exhibit many of the risk behaviours also found among younger people.

Source

1. UNAIDS "AIDS by the numbers 2015"